Cuttin' tha cord...

Discussion in 'General Paracord Discussion' started by HardcoreSlot, Aug 19, 2013.

  1. HardcoreSlot

    HardcoreSlot Member

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    How do you guys cut your paracord?
    Ive tried a few things,
    Knives unless really sharp like to grab and pull strands, ruining your pretty strands.
    Scissors, again need to be really sharp or you get real ragget ends that are hard to burn and once you do it ends up as a big goober...

    The best thing Ive found is a razor blade on a block of really soft wood.
    Lay the cord on the block and just press with the razor. makes a clean cut that is quick and easy to burn. It also allows you to make angled cuts.

    I would like to try a quality cigar cutter too. In my mind it would be cool, but Ive never so much as handled one much less used one to cut cord? Anyone got input on this?

    So what do you guys use??
     
  2. J-Will

    J-Will ermahgerd perrkerd

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    I use either a razor blade just like you do, or a snap off blade utility knife.
     

  3. Vin

    Vin Admin

    Same here. Razor blade on a flexible plastic cutting board. Works the best for me. I like this because you can get the angle right!
     
  4. DrMarneaus

    DrMarneaus New Member

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    I use the one cutting tool I'm most proficient with....Xacto knife. Number 11 blade will get you in really tight spots and you can saw right through it. Keep em fresh, dull blades suck.

    5 years of architecture school will make you cut just about everything with an Xacto, haha.
     
  5. Vin

    Vin Admin

    Troof! So will 5 years at a sign company.
     
  6. MrParacord

    MrParacord Moderator

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    I've bought these little scissors from Marc's for $.88 they are made in China but they have a Lifetime Warranty. They are very sharp.
    Before I bought those which was about four weeks ago I was using a pair of scissors from my clipper set.
    Before those I was using the scissors on my SAK Classic and the scissors on my Leatherman New Wave.

    I like the small precision scissors for paracord.
     
  7. Hydrashoks

    Hydrashoks ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    I use a pair of snips.

    simple, cheap, and it works the best IMO

    [​IMG]
     
  8. MrParacord

    MrParacord Moderator

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    Nice but a little pricey.
     
  9. Sparky_D

    Sparky_D I'm a frayed knot...

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    A long time ago, I worked at a sewing plant and we used a soldering iron with an Exacto blade attachment for cutting the nylon strips for zipper pulls.

    I was toying with making something similar with one of my old soldering irons. That way I could cut and fuse the ends at the same time.

    But then I realized I don't actually do enough cutting to justify it. Now I either use my Mora Companion (sharpest fixed blade knife I have EVER bought) or just heat a #11 blade in a candle.

    Maybe if I were doing projects that used a lot of specific lengths of cord it would make sense to do the soldering iron thing...
     
  10. HardcoreSlot

    HardcoreSlot Member

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    all good suggestions... Xacto is a good one..

    Hmmmm.... This got me thinkin',(scary, i konw) has anyone seen the styrofoam cutting tables with the one heated wire that runs vertically, kinda like a scroll saw?
    I wonder if that would work??? I dont believe making one would be too difficult...
     
  11. HamiltonFelix

    HamiltonFelix New Member

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    If I was cutting a lot of any synthetic cord, I'd go with a heated blade or something like the styrofoam cutting table with a hot nichrome wire. But most of us are moving around in the Real World and may need to cut at unpredictable times and places. So the most practical advice is to always have a SHARP blade. An improvised "cutting board" to work against is a bonus.

    It can be a chore to keep one's EDC knives razor sharp. My Al Mar SERE 2000 sees constant use, followed by my neck knife (presently a Cold Steel Spike) and my Leatherman WAVE. My Bowen Survivor buckle (single edged, of course, and at least 30 years old) sees more use as a beer cap lifter, but it's always there as my least used backup blade. If you can't keep all of 'em touched up, at least keep one very sharp. I must admit, the knifemaker's belt sander and the 6000 grit belt have made life easier.

    For larger cordage, usually twist, rarely kernmantle, I like the serrated blade on the Leatherman. Wrap the location to be cut with electrical tape, then cut it through the tape. Melt ends as time permits. Serrated blade is also great for plastic tie wraps. I use a lot of these cable ties to hang tags at work.

    Paracord really should have the ends melted every single time. I confess to occasionally slipping up in this department - but I know better.
     
  12. HardcoreSlot

    HardcoreSlot Member

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    I agree that the blades you keep on ya should be sharp.
    I was thinking more of when you are sitting down doing projects.
    If im out in the world cuttin cords I usually just cut it off with a knife and put a knot in the end to keep it from fraying all over the place.
     
  13. MidwestCord

    MidwestCord New Member

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    Interesting options mentioned here! I have considered the hot knife solution, but I have never used one to know what the benefits / drawbacks of that would be. I personally use sharp scissors and a lighter. I do heatseal a LOT of cord this way, maybe I should consider upgrading the process at some point!
     
  14. knottystuff4u

    knottystuff4u Paradude

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  15. Jerry-D-Young

    Jerry-D-Young Seeker of Knowledge

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    As soon as I try the angle cutter on my Spool Tool I'll give a report. It looks like it should work well.

    Just my opinion.
     
  16. Jerry-D-Young

    Jerry-D-Young Seeker of Knowledge

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    Well, I had a few minutes to play with one of the TricornE Spool Tools I received the other day.

    100' of cord fills it fully.
    The angled blade cutter slices through 550 cord like butter, minimizing pulling kerns or shredding the mantle.

    Putting the cord into the largest of the fusing notches was a bit hard until I learned to stretch the cord just slightly and then slide it in rather than trying to push it straight down into the notch & hole.

    The mini-Bic lighter is held securely, but pops in and out easily with the right technique, which is pretty obvious after trying it a couple of times.

    A note: Though the documentation doesn't say so, I put the lighter in with the push button inside, with it at the end of the holder with the small protrusion. This way the lighter button is protected and can't be activated in the pack or anything.

    With the cord in the fusing notch it is easy to burn, and there is no twisting or distorting of the cord as can occur when holding in one's hand and manipulating it to get the flame just so.

    I highly recommend the product. I have two, and will be getting more.
    http://www.spooltool.us/#!home/mainPage

    Just my opinion.
     
  17. JohnsonwiVP

    JohnsonwiVP New Member

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    Knives tug on your cord if you pull up vertically, but works. I use a sharp pair of scissors, and kinda work with it until the whole cord is cut, then I burn the end with a lighter, then I use a pair of pliers to pinch the end to a tapered finish so I can fit it through tigt\ht holes kind of like a show lace tip.
     
  18. MrParacord

    MrParacord Moderator

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    Thanks for the info/review of that product.
     
  19. spleify

    spleify Paracord nut

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    I find using a good pair of scissors is simply the best and fastest way to go.