When It Comes to Paracord, Tangle Free Is the Way to Be

  1. GPS1504
    As much as I love paracord and paracord crafts, what I do not like is the mess that can be made when storing it. For years I have used a backpack for paracord storage. This made sense because I used to make and sell a lot of different paracord items, and sometimes I would make things while travelling. It was easy to pick up a backpack, sling it over my shoulder, and go on about my way. What was not so easy was dealing with the paracord inside the bag.

    When I would acquire a new hank of paracord, I tried to leave it in the package as long as possible, only pulling out what I needed at any given time. That worked okay for a while, when I was doing small projects that only required a few feet at a time. Well, then I got into making rifle and shotgun slings and began needing 30 or 40 feet at a time. It was then that things got messy. Despite my best efforts, it was impossible to keep paracord from wadding up in a huge knot. I created some really amazing knots, let me tell you. I am not even sure how it was possible, but I did it. I would even go through and straighten a whole hank just to pull some out to use immediately thereafter and wind up with yet another knot!

    The method I took to using, finally, was wrapping the cord around the palm of my hand and then wrapping it down around my elbow to form a new hank. I did this with every new paracord purchase I made. I then secured it with a rubber band in the center to hold it all together. This worked fine for keeping paracord somewhat organized, but the problem still existed when I pulled some cord off of the hank for use. I had to be very careful and pull it under the rubber band one section at a time when removing cord to make sure it did not tangle. This was something I was willing to live with, although it was still a tad inconvenient and slowed the process down. There has to be (and is!) and easier way.

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    The most obvious conclusion is a spool. You can spool your paracord in several ways, such as by placing it on a carabiner that will enable it to spin. Also possible is using an actual spool-just wrap it on there and you're good to go. Some paracord already comes on spools, so you can reuse those spools to house new cord as you use the cord that came on the spool. If you do not have a spool, you can buy a plastic holder used to house kite string or fishing line. It is basically a spool in another shape, being oblong. Less convenient than a round spool and a little bit harder to use, but still effective enough to make it worthwhile. You can also make a cardboard spool if you have access to cardboard and scissors. It will need to be shaped like the kite string spool but has great potential for those of us who like to save money whenever possible. If you have cardboard and scissors lying around, then you have the materials needed to make a spool. Another benefit of cardboard is that you can write the name of the color stored on it, especially if it is something unusual that you may not remember but might want to order again.

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    Also possible is storing your paracord in a plastic bottle with a lid. Place the cord inside the bottle and pull one end out through a hole punched in the lid. This seems like it could be effective but it also seems to have potential for disaster. I have not tried it and can't say I plan to, but if you have and it worked, let us know.

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    Having a rat's nest of paracord is a huge pain. Avoiding it at all costs is highly advisable in order to save time and frustration. By whatever means necessary, tangle free is the way to be.

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