Paracord Your Ride

  1. GPS1504
    While having paracord on your person is important, so is having it in your vehicle. Most of our travels are done by commuting in our cars and trucks, making them an extension of our homes. Those of us with particularly long commutes practically do live out of our vehicles, stocking them with all sorts of survival supplies. I, for instance, always have jumper cables, a hydraulic jack, a case of water, and both thick rope for emergency tows and paracord for most anything else because you simply never know what you might need and when.

    One of the many situations you can find yourself in is stranded with a vehicle accident or breakdown. Some of these situations are easily remedied while others require major repair. Falling in the middle of that, however, are a few minor fixes you can do with paracord. If you get in a fender bender, for example, and now your hood or trunk will not stay closed, tie it down with paracord. This is not a permanent fix, however, but can get you through in the meantime. Some brave souls claim you can even use paracord to temporarily replace a broken fan belt by tying knots in it and wrapping it around the pulley system. Try this at your own risk, of course, but you may be pleasantly surprised.

    In order for paracord to work for your vehicle, paracord needs to be in your vehicle. This could be as simple as throwing a hank of it in the glove box or under the seat. You can also use it to enhance the interior of your vehicle, too. Have a steering wheel that can use a little extra grip? Wrap it in paracord or tie cobra knots around the sections where you place your hands. What about the grab handle for getting in and out of your passenger seat? You can paracord that, too. It looks pretty cool as well as serving a couple of purposes. Not only does it add comfortable gripping surfaces, it also protects the surfaces it covers, adding longevity to them.

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    It is fairly easy to wrap steering wheels or grab handles in paracord with either a cobra stitch or simply wrapping rungs of paracord side by side. The only difficulty is in working at sometimes awkward angles. If you decide to paracord your ride, be careful when sealing your paracord at the end. If you burn it, do so very carefully as you do not want to scar your vehicle permanently with the flame. Tying it in a hidden knot at the end might be a better option for you as it is easier to break loose and untie when you need it and there is no danger of dropped or misplaced lighters.

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    Considering that we are in our vehicles so often, it only makes sense to have paracord there with us. If you need paracord for any purpose, it is already there. You might take that hank out from under your seat and forget to replace it, but if you have a paracord steering wheel, then you still have paracord in your vehicle, just waiting for you to call upon it. May you, and your vehicle, enjoy the gift of paracord accessories!

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